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CMYK sc reen printing

6 years 8 months ago #4911 by alexheap
CMYK sc reen printing was created by alexheap
After watching a few videos on screen printing and cmyk screen printing, i decided to convert a photo into the four process colours and have them print ready. So if i was to now have this photo screen printed it would come out as seen in the end result. As a geek and lover of printing i find this truly amazing!

Alex Heap
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6 years 8 months ago #4931 by brenden
Replied by brenden on topic CMYK sc reen printing
Looks awesome Alex! Can I share this on Facebook? And do you have a Facebook business page I could link too?

Cheers,

Senior Product Manager
Wilcom - Sydney, Australia

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6 years 8 months ago - 6 years 8 months ago #4933 by alexheap
Replied by alexheap on topic CMYK sc reen printing
Hi Brenden of course you can share this. The business page is www.facebook.com/brickwallgifts

Alex Heap

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6 years 8 months ago - 6 years 8 months ago #4937 by CCSP
Replied by CCSP on topic CMYK sc reen printing
That's pretty cool. I am a screen printer, myself, but I have to say, I have not yet found the courage to try any four color process printing. I have done some simulated process printing, which is my preferred method.

Even after working with screen printing separations for years, I still find myself constantly impressed by what can be created through these processes...It's really an eye opener to look at the separations like this sometimes. It really makes you see how complex this process is...anyway, that is an awesome picture. It sounds like you aren't a printer at the moment, but if you ever get the opportunity to try printing a design or two, I highly recommend it :)

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6 years 8 months ago #4938 by alexheap
Replied by alexheap on topic CMYK sc reen printing
Im not a printer professionally no. Everything i know about printing i have learned from watching videos and by practicing. The first time i started printing (2010) was actually screen printing. It came about when i wanted to make some tshirts but didnt have the money to source any. So i researched and found screen printing. I bought a squeegee, a screen (which i had to beg the supplier to pre-burn the image for me) and some water based ink.

I built my press from an old rollerblade frame and part of an old wooden desk, and just mass produced tshirts which i bought cheaply from a local supermarket. From then i always thought screen printing was only for single colour.

After a while i found that screen printing on my dining table was far too messy. So i went in search for someone else to do them for me. I found a small shop in the middle of a market in the center of town and this shop only offered vinyl printing. I spoke with the person about what id been doing and what i need and he offered me a job :-) and im still here now.

Ive got a long way to go and so much to learn, everyday i learn something new and i love a good challenge. When i discovered this cmyk screen printing i nearly fell off my chair i was that gobsmacked! i only thought the only way id achieve something like the picture i attached would be DTG/light jet and dark jet. But in the future i would like to think i can get into screen printing professionally, its an amazing skill to have!

I do plan to make a video tutorial for generating images like i have done above. but when it comes to burning onto the screen, im afraid my knowledge stops there. I tried using emulsion once, and what a disaster that was :pinch:

Alex Heap
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6 years 8 months ago #4939 by CCSP
Replied by CCSP on topic CMYK sc reen printing
Wow, well it sounds like you have a lot ahead of you! It really is an awesome field, I have been lucky enough to have the chance to apprentice under some very different printers and I have worked with some rather eccentric artists, and it is the type of work where I get extremely excited every time I learn something new.

Now I have a job doing artwork, not printing, but we mostly do very simple designs (mainly block letter, duty shirts, etc.) I have recently started a side business with a friend, however, and we are designing and printing our own shirts to sell as a line. Even now, not working under anyone, my friend and I are learning new things about printing almost every time we go into the shop, and we have both been printers for years...

I am excited to see the video you make. As far as prepping screens, just don't quit! It takes a while to get all that stuff right, because on the surface it seems like it should be simple, but it is really complicated.

I would love to see more of your work eventually, so make sure you post anything else cool that you happen to do :)
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6 years 8 months ago #4946 by brenden
Replied by brenden on topic CMYK sc reen printing

alexheap wrote: Hi Brenden of course you can share this. The business page is www.facebook.com/brickwallgifts


Thanks mate! :)

Cheers,

Senior Product Manager
Wilcom - Sydney, Australia

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6 years 8 months ago - 6 years 8 months ago #4976 by alexheap
Replied by alexheap on topic CMYK sc reen printing
@ccsp

this is my first press that only cost me a few pounds to put together. it worked amazingly, never had any problems with it and i printed hundreds of garments with it!




Alex Heap
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6 years 5 months ago #7174 by paradoxsc
Replied by paradoxsc on topic CMYK sc reen printing
We primarily do screen printing and we do a good bit of CMYK and simulated process prints. Getting good results with process prints relies heavily on your artwork and screen set-up process and also the inks/screen mesh you use.

If you try to do CMYK separations/films right out of photoshop/corel for your first time chances are you will get crappy results.

I'll do a little guide on the best methods to get a good CMYK print on here:

1) First you need to determine what you can & can't achieve with the equipment you have. Here's what I would recommend for exceptional CMYK prints on white garments:

-Separation Software - Takes high res full color images and splits the colors for output
-Epson large format inkjet printer - Great for film output
-All Black ink system - Allows Rip to produce darker/heavier prints
-Rip Software - Outputs best halftone dots and gives you heavier ink deposit
-Waterproof Transparency Film - Formulated for inkjet ink and screen development
-Plastisol CMYK ink set w/ photoshop or corel color profile to match.
-Dual Cure Photopolymer Emulsion (pink) - Produces crisp halftone
-At least 4x 305 mesh count aluminum screens - 305 is the standard for detailed process work
-A vacuum exposure unit - Burns images efficiently with less error
-Washout sink/booth and a quick screen drying process - We use compressed air to blow off the screens after washing the image out to prevent runny emulsion from dripping into the exposed image
-At least a 4 color press (6 or more is ideal) w/ micro adjustments - You'll need to hold registration perfectly to get good results with process printing. The more solid your press is the better your registration will be.
-Sharp squeegee blades and a printer who is consistent - may sound silly to mention but the print stoke has everything to do with the final product.
-Pallet Adhesive - Holds shirt in place for life of print
-Clean Pallets and clear tape - Pallets without a lot of fuzz build up will get better results and the clear tape is for easy registration.

In an ideal world you would already have all of this stuff but if you don't just follow tis guide to the best of your abilities and see if process printing is really an area you're ready to get into. If you're shop doesn't have a huge demand for CMYK you may want to source your process work to more experienced printers instead of investing in this knowledge/equipment.

I'm doing this guide for photoshop because thats what we use for film output but Corel isn't much different so just follow along.

Step 1 - Artwork Prep & Film Output:

Open your image in Photoshop in RGB mode.
*note: Do all of your image enhancing in RGB mode NOT CMYK. Once you're satisfied with the image you can convert to CMYK for final output.*

Enhance your image particularly brightness contrast to get a better looking print, you tend to loose a lot of deep colors in printing so the more vibrant it is now the more vibrant your final result will be.

This is where having a separation software can cut down on your time, as most of them have presets for such things but if you only plan to do CMYK and not simulated or huge indexed prints you can get by without this software.

So without the separation software you will need a CMYK color profile that matches your CMYK ink set. Most of the manufacturers have a download link on the product page. We use International Coatings ProBrite series for CMYK that comes with a color profile. What this color profile does is when you switch from RBG to CMYK mode is enhances your image for halftone output.
-Dot gain compensation - Compensates for actually ink bleed on substrate
-Pantone matching - Converts image to exact pantone match of ink set
-Curves/Levels - Adjusts image even more to enhance print

To load this profile in photoshop go to Edit>Color Settingsā€¦>Load..
Once loaded you can safely convert your image to CMYK mode by clicking Image>Mode>CMYK

Now you should have a print ready image, if your not satisfied with the look of it hit Edit>Undo and enhance it more until you get a good result.

If you have a rip software you can either use it now and select the option for it to do a CMYK sep for you with black overprint or you can separate them yourself and print them one-by-one. The following is for one-by-one output.

Ok so for output you need to flatten the image Layer>Flatten Image. You should new have a white background and only a single layer that is locked.

Go to the channels palette and on the top right hand side of it there should be a little clickable drop down menu. Hit that and select "split channels".

Four separate images should pop open. You want to output each one of these at the same size WITH REGISTRATION & CENTER CROP MARKS and make sure you select your rip software as the output printer. It helps to also include document info on your films too, to distinguish which color is which(Yellow,Magenta,Cyan,Black).

A rip software will determine the dot angles and LPI (lines per inch) for you. If you do not have a rip an additional step is required here for output. I highly recommend you get a rip software or at least a trail version to do your first CMYK job. Manual output is a tricky process.
Without a rip:

1) After splitting the channels select Image>mode>bitmap. A dialog will appear and ask you what you want your output resolution to be.

You should have already been working at 300 DPI or better so in some cases you can leave it the same. I usually do 600 or more, this is a tricky subject and many people argue here about what is best so figure out what works for you by messing with this setting/each image is different.

Below that you'll see "Method" use halftone Screen. Hit OK. Now it will ask you for your frequency For manual printing use 45 LPI for automatic Use 55 LPI KEEP THIS THE SAME ON EVERY COLOR.

For angle, If you don't know about printing patterns like Rossette and Miore and how to harness or avoid them I suggest using the same angle for each at 22.5 degrees it works pretty well for CMYK. Again, a lot of people will argue here about the best method but for newbies I would do it this way, less confusion.

Now for shape select Round. Hit OK. If your image doesn't look clear repeat the process and add to your output resolution until you get solid results. REPEAT THIS FOR EVERY COLOR AND KEEP THE SAME SETTINGS FOR ALL. They have to be consistent!

2) You should be able to print the images now, make sure you select your darkest/heaviest ink settings and always print in greyscale. Don't worry about the white background because inkjet printers can't print in white.

Once they are printed make sure you Align them all by hand first before you burn them. It sounds silly but you can save yourself a lot of headache later in the process by triple checking your films at this stage. We've gotten plenty of jobs to the press and realized the Magenta film or something came out at a slightly different size than the others. If you see one that is off just reprint and recheck it until they all align perfectly.

2) Screen Prep & Set-Up:

Align each film to each screen at the same spot within your presses safe zone (where your image will properly land on the pallet at the arm/head down position). A pre registration system helps a lot here but isn't necessary. I'll assume you know how to burn screens and not dive to deep into this.

Make sure you do a properly timed burn. I find that with halftones our burn time is less than with normal spot color printing because of light refraction through the glass. The light tends to bend around the image and choke the dots more than desired when burning. Your rip software should have a test print option that will give you a halftone gradient image to do test burns with. Use this and learn your burn times for high detail prints, every shops exposure equipment is different and has different burn time.

Once Burned wash them out and let dry. You'll find that with higher mesh count and high detail images your image will wash out faster than normal. Check with a backlight here to make sure it fully washed out.

Let dry.

3) Registration & Set-Up:

Tape off all of the screens.
*Do not cover registration marks*

Figure out your head rotation and print order. The print order should be:
YELLOW-MAGENTA-CYAN-BLACK

Set the up like that on-press so you will have a proper flow when printing.

Register your black screen to your desired print location and lock down your registration knobs.

Now grab a white shirt or test pellon and do a black print with registration marks. Make sure you add enough adhesive so the sub straight won't move. Grab some clear tape and tape over the entire print you just did, careful not to smudge it. You can use this to align all of the other screens to your black print one-by-one and actually do test prints right onto the tape. Use a little screen opener and a rag to wipe it clean like a dry erase board. Continue this process unlit every prints marks line up perfectly with the black. Once all of your screens are aligned and registration is locked you can do your first test print. Print everything wet-on-wet (no flash) and leave registration marks untaped to spot if a color falls out of registration.

AGAIN: Print - Yellow then Magenta then Cyan then Black. In that order!

You should see a great looking print at this point if you followed my guide and can tape those registration marks up and begin your job.

I hope this guide helps someone figure out the process a bit easier.

Also don't take a process job from a client until you've got a few under your belt and feel comfortable doing it.

Let me know if you have any questions!
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6 years 3 days ago #9291 by alexheap
Replied by alexheap on topic CMYK sc reen printing
late reply...

@paradoxsc from what youve just said there i was amazed! i think with the picture i made i was only looking at the tip of the iceberg, let alone touching it!!

I never had my images put onto a screen and tested but from what youve said, it wouldnt work anyway :P money well saved then :P

Alex Heap

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5 years 10 months ago #9973 by texpri
Replied by texpri on topic CMYK sc reen printing
hey paradoxsc,

what a sep software u use or wich one u would recommend? ultraseps , tseps or separation studio?

thx

Andreas

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5 years 10 months ago #9974 by paradoxsc
Replied by paradoxsc on topic CMYK sc reen printing
We use t-seps 3 and separation studio. T-seps mainly for separating spot colors and cmyk process. Separation studio for simulated process prints KEEP IN MIND: separation studio requires a specific IC ink set provided by Ryonet that you have to stock/buy to use! It's about $3-400 for the ink set maybe more (gallons). If you don't buy the ink the software is useless. We use accurip and an epson 1430 with blackmaxx ink kit for films. Fun fact: Accurip will do cmyk prints without a sep software. If you convert your image with a cmyk profile to match your inks you can then just hit print and go to options and select print as cmyk 22.5 degrees and 45lpi setting with black overprint checked. (55lpi for automatic press).

Hope this helps!
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5 years 10 months ago #10103 by garmentdecor
Replied by garmentdecor on topic CMYK sc reen printing

paradoxsc wrote: We use t-seps 3 and separation studio. T-seps mainly for separating spot colors and cmyk process. Separation studio for simulated process prints KEEP IN MIND: separation studio requires a specific IC ink set provided by Ryonet that you have to stock/buy to use! It's about $3-400 for the ink set maybe more (gallons). If you don't buy the ink the software is useless.


Have to disagree with you here. The software does not become useless if you do not have Ryonets inks. We have never used Ryonets inks and we would urge you not to get the seperation studio color set! You get the best results when you match the spot color. For example, if a design needed a sky blue ink - we wouldn't use Ryonets royal blue ink that they suggest. We always look for colors in the design and match them with colors we have. This allows us to accurately color match

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